As a runner, you probably know how good it feels to push for the finish line, or beat your best time. There is no better feeling than being in your best running shape, and striving for athletic accomplishment and post-race bliss.
[clear]
[/clear]
You probably also know that the pain and setback of having an injury can be devastating. Over fifteen years ago my athletic career suffered a major setback after tearing the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in my knee. As a competitive gymnast I was unable to keep training due to my knee “giving out” during running or tumbling. You can probably imagine how dangerous weak ligaments in the knee would be while trying to land back-flips on a beam.
[clear]
[/clear]
Despite this, I persevered in other sports and took up running. With running, I could always set my own pace and only push myself as much as I wanted to. I thought I could nurse this injury and strengthen the muscles around the knee to stabilize the joint, but I soon realized that this was not going to be a permanent solution.
[clear]
[/clear]
While trail-running one day, the uneven surface of slippery leaves, roots and pine cones got the best of my unstable knee, causing me to roll over on my ankle and tear the lateral ligaments of my ankle joint. Rest, ice, Ibuprofen? I guess so. While this is the typical treatment for a sprained ankle, it will not tighten stretched ligaments.
[clear]
[/clear]
At that point, I was an athletic teen with torn ligaments in both my ankle and my knee, a recipe for both chronic joint instability and scar tissue. Of course, I kept running.
[clear]
[/clear]
I never recovered well from these injuries and they were always a road-block to my progression as an athlete and a runner. I had to stop doing gymnastics, I tried physiotherapy religiously, I wore a knee brace at the age of 10. What I battled with was frustration about my weaknesses and I learned compassion for other athletes with these setbacks.
[clear]
[/clear]
I am now fully recovered, and can run, hike, climb, jump, leap and sprint with no problem in either my ankle or my knee. For the first time since all this started, I feel stable on my feet and nothing is standing in the way of my progress. How did I repair my ligaments and strengthen the connective tissue in my joints? I tried prolotherapy, a non-surgical alternative to rebuilding ligaments and cartilage, and restoring the structural integrity of the joint.
[clear]
[/clear]
Prolotherapy is a regenerative injection technique (RIT) where solutions of dextrose (a concentrated sugar) and lidocaine are injected into the joint and its surrounding ligament and tendon attachments, thereby provoking a controlled and localized inflammatory response. This brings the body’s own healing cells to repair damage and rebuild connective tissue, thus resulting in increased stability and reduced pain.
[clear]
[/clear]
Prolotherapy has been well-researched and is now touted as an effective alternative to arthroscopic surgery or joint replacement. The best part? Prolotherapy requires virtually no down-time and lasting results, so you can get back to your sport. This treatment in not just for knees and ankles, either. Virtually any joint in the body can be treated, and prolotherapy has shown significant results for a wide variety of sports injuries and osteoarthritic pains.
[clear]
[/clear]
As a recovered athlete and naturopathic doctor, I have embraced both sports medicine and prolotherapy in my practice. Because of my history in dealing with sports injuries and my own personal success with prolotherapy, it is my passion to help others recover from their injuries and achieve their future goals.
[clear]
[/clear]

Please contact me at ayla@draylawilson.com with your questions